Black Children Especially Vulnerable to Second-Hand Tobacco Smoke

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Black Children Especially Vulnerable to Second-Hand Tobacco Smoke

MedPage Today March 12, 2007
CINCINNATI -- African-American children are particularly susceptible to exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke, according to researchers here.
Both in serum and hair, African-American children had significantly higher levels of cotinine (P=0.001 and P<0.0001 respectively) than did Caucasian children exposed to similar amounts of second-hand smoke, found Stephen Wilson, M.D., of the University of Cincinnati.
More information on tobacco
Reference:
Wilson SE et al. "The Role of Air Nicotine in Explaining Racial Differences in Cotinine Among Tobacco-Exposed Children." CHEST 2007; 131:856-862.
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