Medications

Thrive® lozenges   

This product is manufactured by Novartis using the ingredient nicotine.

This product is taken via sucking and oral absorption.

Why is it prescribed?

As an aid to smoking cessation for partial relief of nicotine withdrawal symptoms. This treatment should be used as part of a comprehensive behavioural smoking-cessation program.


Thrive® Lozenges dissolve quickly in your mouth, releasing controlled amounts of nicotine into your body for relief of your cravings and withdrawal symptoms. One lozenge should be placed in the mouth and allowed to dissolve. Move the lozenge occasionally from one side of the mouth to the other. Repeat until the lozenge is completely dissolved (about 30 minutes).

For some people, the nicotine in Thrive® Lozenge can occasionally cause mouth or throat irritation, headaches, nausea, hiccups, upset stomach or dizziness. 

Store between 15-30°C. Protect from light.


Alternatives

Other products that have the same ingredient as Thrive® lozenges are •Habitrol® patches •Nicoderm® patches •Nicorette® gum •Nicorette® inhaler •Nicorette® Lozenges •Nicorette® Quick Mist •Nicotine Gum •Nicotine Patch •Thrive® gum •

See other products used in the treatment of •nicotine withdrawal symptoms •

If you smoke up to 1 package of cigarettes/day use the 1mg strength lozenges. If you smoke 1 package or more /day, use the 2 mg strength lozenges. Suck 1 lozenge when you feel the urge to smoke, but initially try to use no more than 1 lozenge every 1-2 hours. Most people use 8 - 12 lozenges per day. The product is designed to be sucked slowly. Do not swallow or chew. Only use 1 lozenge at a time. The maximum daily dose is 25 of the 1mg lozenges or 15 of the 2mg lozenges. Treatment should continue for at least 3 months, after which time the number of lozenges should gradually be reduced.


Nicotine replacement therapy provides a lower level of nicotine to your blood than cigarettes, and allows the body's need for nicotine to gradually go away. It works as a temporary aid to help with smoking cessation by reducing nicotine cravings and nicotine withdrawal symptoms.


Along with its needed effects, nicotine replacement may cause some unwanted or undesirable effects. Generally, nicotine replacement is well tolerated and many people will not experience unwanted effects. The frequency and severity of these effects is dependant on many factors including dose, duration of therapy and individual susceptibility. Possible unwanted effects include:

  • belching
  • increased appetite
  • injury or irritation to mouth, teeth or dental work (chewing gum only)
  • trouble sleeping
  • unusual dreams

Rare:

  • fast or irregular heartbeat
  • high blood pressure
  • hives
  • rash
  • stomach pain
  • coughing
  • irritability

 


Do not continue to smoke while using nicotine replacement products.(If using nicotine gum to cut back, do not smoke at the same time as chewing gum.) If you smoke or use other nicotine-containing products while using nicotine replacement you may get a nicotine overdose. Signs of an overdose include headaches, dizziness, nausea, abdominal pain, drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, cold sweat, blurred vision, difficulty with hearing, mental confusion, weakness and fainting, rapid heartbeat and difficulty breathing. If you experience any of these symptoms contact your doctor or Poison Control Centre at once.

Do not use nicotine replacement therapy if you have:

  • certain heart conditions (e.g. heart attacks, heart beat irregularities)is contraindicated.
  • recent stroke
  • skin diseases
  • known allergy to the patches or to nicotine

Consult your doctor first if you have ever had any of the following:

  • irregular heart beat (arrhythmia)
  • high blood pressure
  • overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism)
  • stomach ulcers
  • kidney or liver disease
  • diabetes requiring insulin
  • treatment for poor circulation
  • rashes from adhesive tape or bandages

Drug Interactions: It is important to tell your doctor and pharmacist of any prescription or over-the-counter medications you are taking. In some cases the dose of one or both drugs may need to be altered or another drug may be prescribed. The concentration of medication in the body may be altered by smoking cessation with or without nicotine replacement. The dosage of certain medications may require adjustment. Drugs whose concentrations may be affected by smoking cessation include:

  • acetaminophen
  • imipramine
  • oxazepam
  • propranolol
  • theophylline
  • insulin
  • prazosin
  • labetalol

Use in pregnancy: Consult your doctor or pharmacist if you suspect you are pregnant.
Use while breastfeeding: Consult your doctor or pharmacist before use.


Page Last Updated: 05/10/2016